Edmunds Answers

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  • avatar MrShift@Edmunds 10/12/12 10:16 am PST

    hard to say what's going on since we can't see all your timing marks, etc.


    You can check for bent valves by buying one of those "spark plug air compressor fittings". Then you turn the engine until a particular cylinder is at TDC (both valves closed), then pressurize that cylinder. You'll know right away if you have a leak/bent valve because it won't hold pressure.

    A compression tester might also tell you something.

    If you rotate the engine by hand and feel a "catch", then you might have things lined up wrong.

Answers

  • MrShift@Edmunds 10/12/12 10:16 am PST

    hard to say what's going on since we can't see all your timing marks, etc.


    You can check for bent valves by buying one of those "spark plug air compressor fittings". Then you turn the engine until a particular cylinder is at TDC (both valves closed), then pressurize that cylinder. You'll know right away if you have a leak/bent valve because it won't hold pressure.

    A compression tester might also tell you something.

    If you rotate the engine by hand and feel a "catch", then you might have things lined up wrong.

  • zaken1 10/12/12 3:27 pm PST

    The 2.2 liter OHV motor used on this car is a non-interference motor. There was also a 2.4 liter DOHC motor used on some Cavalier models; which is an interference motor. The person who told you that this is an interference motor apparently was not aware of the difference between these motors.

    Because this is a non interference motor; there is little chance that you have a bent valve or pushrod. This motor does not have a hydraulic timing chain tensioner; so oil pressure is not required to keep the chain tight (but the 2.4 liter motor does have that troublesome design).

    If you installed a new tensioner when replacing the timing chain; if you did not pull the retaining pin out of the tensioner after it was mounted in place; the spring in the tensioner would not be holding the chain tight; and it would probably jump out of time as soon as it cranked over. If you did not replace the timing chain tensioner; it probably is necessary to compress the tensioner spring, and insert a pin in it to hold the spring compressed until after all the parts were mounted. If you did not do that; the chain is probably not tensioned properly.

    This is why it is necessary to have a good quality service manual and read all the instructions before working on a potentially critical job which you are not familiar with.

    I expect the timing cover will now have to be removed; the chain retimed, and the tensioner taken out and the spring compressed and temporarily held in place with a retaining pin, until all the parts are installed. If this is too difficult to do; a new tensioner can be bought for about $20.

  • rjakmc2010 10/12/12 5:38 pm PST

    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
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    ^^^^^^^^ Thank you guys so much for the info. i really do appreciate it & really needed it!!! will be trying these over the weekend will keep posted on what the results Are...both of you have a safe and nice weekend may it be a blessed one. :) glad to know there are some people out there who do care about others

  • MrShift@Edmunds 10/12/12 7:54 pm PST

    You could have interference problems however, if your cam timing is wrong, which is why I suggested gently turning the engine by hand.



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