Edmunds Answers

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  • avatar karjunkie 04/23/09 3:41 pm PST

    Most slop in the steering can be removed by adjusting the steering box. Most steering boxes have an adjustment mechanism. That adjustment on an S-10 is pretty simple to make. if you look down on the steering box you will see an adjusting screw with a straight slot for a regular screwdriver. Around that is a lock nut. Using a screwdriver, hold the adjusting screw and loosen the lock nut. Turning the adjuster in tightens the steering and turning it out will loosen it. Turn it in about ¼ turn and tighten the lock nut. Check the steering play, it should have about one inch of play to be adjusted right. If it is still too loose, adjust it some more. I usually drive it around the block to settle the box before making another adjustment. .Many times the slop can be eliminated by adjusting the pitman shaft end play as well. The next step is to check the idler arms and tie rod ends for wear and tear. The tie rod ends in particular on this vehicle have been known for wearing out and causing excessive play in the steering.

Answers

  • karjunkie 04/23/09 3:41 pm PST

    Most slop in the steering can be removed by adjusting the steering box. Most steering boxes have an adjustment mechanism. That adjustment on an S-10 is pretty simple to make. if you look down on the steering box you will see an adjusting screw with a straight slot for a regular screwdriver. Around that is a lock nut. Using a screwdriver, hold the adjusting screw and loosen the lock nut. Turning the adjuster in tightens the steering and turning it out will loosen it. Turn it in about ¼ turn and tighten the lock nut. Check the steering play, it should have about one inch of play to be adjusted right. If it is still too loose, adjust it some more. I usually drive it around the block to settle the box before making another adjustment. .Many times the slop can be eliminated by adjusting the pitman shaft end play as well. The next step is to check the idler arms and tie rod ends for wear and tear. The tie rod ends in particular on this vehicle have been known for wearing out and causing excessive play in the steering.

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