Edmunds Answers

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  • avatar karjunkie 05/27/09 9:12 am PST

    It could be several things that you can remedy pretty easily like a clogged air or fuel filter, worn spark plugs, clogged PCV valve or a dirty EGR or IAC valve. If its been more than 2 years since you changed the PCV valve or the fuel and air filters that should be your first step. Cleaning the IAC is easily done with a toothbrush and spray throttle body cleaner after removing it from the throttle body which is easily done by just removing the one or two torx-head screws that hold it in place. Once it is clean, together with the hole the IAC’s plunger fits into, use the remainder of the TB cleaner to clean out the inside of the throttle body per the instructions on the can. While you're at it, I would also check the EGR valve and clean it as well with the throttle body spray as a gunked up IAC usually means a gunked up EGR. Good luck and let us know if you have any follow up questions.

Answers

  • karjunkie 05/27/09 9:12 am PST

    It could be several things that you can remedy pretty easily like a clogged air or fuel filter, worn spark plugs, clogged PCV valve or a dirty EGR or IAC valve. If its been more than 2 years since you changed the PCV valve or the fuel and air filters that should be your first step. Cleaning the IAC is easily done with a toothbrush and spray throttle body cleaner after removing it from the throttle body which is easily done by just removing the one or two torx-head screws that hold it in place. Once it is clean, together with the hole the IAC’s plunger fits into, use the remainder of the TB cleaner to clean out the inside of the throttle body per the instructions on the can. While you're at it, I would also check the EGR valve and clean it as well with the throttle body spray as a gunked up IAC usually means a gunked up EGR. Good luck and let us know if you have any follow up questions.

  • skeet317 05/27/09 10:24 pm PST

    I'm quite sure that the items that you mention should be done. I guess my real question is what would cause the hesitation only during the first moments, then allow the vehicle to run normally, yet when turned off, even for a couple of minutes, the same condition--the inability to accelerate properly for a couple of moments--, followed by running well again.

  • karjunkie 05/28/09 7:28 am PST

    All of the things I mention are possible causes of the problem. Since they are normal maintenance items it makes sense to do all of them. However, if you do not want to do them all, then the only solution is to run the car down to your local auto parts store, ask for an OBD II scan which most will do for free and see what codes you get. Once you have the codes, come back here and we can answer your question intelligently without a lot of guessing. Good luck and let us know what codes come up!

  • defloorguy 06/29/09 12:02 am PST

    My 2000 Blazer 4wd 4.3 had the exact same symptoms. Start saving for a motor. Mine ran like that for about 14,000 miles. Beware if you have or have to replace the radiator. I spent $800 getting the top end redone only to have the throw a rod through the bottom end. If your blazer is not showing these symptoms when it is up to operating temperature, you can see what you can trade it for.

    Source: experiance

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