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  • avatar karjunkie 04/05/10 7:55 am PST

    I assume you checked your coolant level right? If the coolant is at the proper level you may have air in the system. There should be a bleeder valve for the cooling system on or near the upper radiator hose connection into the thermostat housing. With the engine fully warmed up and the heater turned up full, open the bleeder valve with a 12 MM wrench until coolant comes out. You will probably see tons of little bubbles. (If you have trouble getting the coolant/air bubbles to come out of the bleeder, just rev the engine a bit, should shoot right out.) Repeat this step a few times until you no longer see air bubbles. It should only be a steady stream of clean coolant. Tighten the bleeder valve, and take the car for a ride to make sure it stays at normal operating temp, be sure there is no leaks, and also that the fan is kicking on.

    If the coolant level is ok and you cannot not find a bleeder valve near the upper radiator hose or thermostat then the way to do it is the old fashioned way I always use. With a cold engine, remove the radiator cap and run the engine until the gauge registers normal operating temprature. Then turn the heater control to full heat. You should see the coolant level drop through the cap opening. Have your coolant ready and add till it is full. Let the engine run to see if the level drops a bit more. Once it stops dropping, replace the cap and turn the engine off.

    Source: 

Answers

  • karjunkie 04/05/10 7:55 am PST

    I assume you checked your coolant level right? If the coolant is at the proper level you may have air in the system. There should be a bleeder valve for the cooling system on or near the upper radiator hose connection into the thermostat housing. With the engine fully warmed up and the heater turned up full, open the bleeder valve with a 12 MM wrench until coolant comes out. You will probably see tons of little bubbles. (If you have trouble getting the coolant/air bubbles to come out of the bleeder, just rev the engine a bit, should shoot right out.) Repeat this step a few times until you no longer see air bubbles. It should only be a steady stream of clean coolant. Tighten the bleeder valve, and take the car for a ride to make sure it stays at normal operating temp, be sure there is no leaks, and also that the fan is kicking on.

    If the coolant level is ok and you cannot not find a bleeder valve near the upper radiator hose or thermostat then the way to do it is the old fashioned way I always use. With a cold engine, remove the radiator cap and run the engine until the gauge registers normal operating temprature. Then turn the heater control to full heat. You should see the coolant level drop through the cap opening. Have your coolant ready and add till it is full. Let the engine run to see if the level drops a bit more. Once it stops dropping, replace the cap and turn the engine off.

    Source: 

  • Stever@Edmunds 04/05/10 7:00 pm PST

    You can reply in this thread by clicking the Answer this Question button and that will help keep all the information in one spot. Thanks!

  • rich141 04/07/10 6:56 am PST

    thank you - just learning how to work through this forum. The info is great.

  • jiggy4 06/08/11 12:32 pm PST

    I have exact same problem as Rich141, and Honda dealership after charging me $65 for check up recommended to replace the head gasket for $1966, which will include replacing head gasket, timing belt and water pump. They think it is head gasket issue. My levels are perfectly fine, and my engine works very normal when airconditioning is on, no matter city or highway. It started when honda dealer completed decarbonization on intake system as well as fuel system clean in my last visit to them after thier recommendations. It could have be coincident, but I also have my doubts that they screwed up something while decarbonizing the intakes. Still thinking whether I should go for this repair or it may have been something else, and repairs would be just waist of money. I saw one thread on the internet which stats that after replacing gasket/timeing belt/water pump/thermostat problem came back after 900 miles. This makes me wonder if it is the program or chip that controls the heating cooling system!?!?!

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