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  • avatar zaken1 02/22/10 11:33 pm PST

    There are four different engines that were used in the 2006 Cherokee: 3.7 liter V-6; 4.7 liter V-8; 5.7 liter V-8, and 6.1 liter V-8. There is enough difference between these 4 motors that I cannot give you good information about the likely causes of your problem unless you open the hood of your car, find out which motor is in your vehicle by reading the emission specification label under the hood, and post that information here (by clicking on the "answer this question" button underneath the last response).

    But on any vehicle; there can be stalling problems if the spark plugs have not been replaced in the last 20,000 miles or so (if your car is not using the recommended platinum or iridium long life plugs), if it was not adjusted properly or the wrong parts were installed, or if the alternator or battery is defective.



Answers

  • zaken1 02/22/10 11:33 pm PST

    There are four different engines that were used in the 2006 Cherokee: 3.7 liter V-6; 4.7 liter V-8; 5.7 liter V-8, and 6.1 liter V-8. There is enough difference between these 4 motors that I cannot give you good information about the likely causes of your problem unless you open the hood of your car, find out which motor is in your vehicle by reading the emission specification label under the hood, and post that information here (by clicking on the "answer this question" button underneath the last response).

    But on any vehicle; there can be stalling problems if the spark plugs have not been replaced in the last 20,000 miles or so (if your car is not using the recommended platinum or iridium long life plugs), if it was not adjusted properly or the wrong parts were installed, or if the alternator or battery is defective.



  • roger71 02/23/10 11:24 am PST

    4.7L V8 4.7L V8

  • zaken1 02/23/10 4:27 pm PST

    Thank you for acepting my response, and also for providing the requested information.

    The most likely causes of your problem are either worn or inappropriately selected spark plugs; a clogged or defective idle air control valve; a fuel injection throttle body that needs cleaning; a defective camshaft position sensor, or a defective crankshaft position sensor. If any vacuum hoses are disconnected or broken, or any vacuum controls have been disconnected or bypassed; that could also cause this problem.

    If you are open to replacing the spark plugs at this time, it would provide a more stable point from which to proceed; and it might even correct the problem. I would highly recommend using a set of Bosch Fusion # 4508. They are a unique design, which I feel is a better match for your engine than other brands. These plugs come preset, and the gap cannot be adjusted.

    The idle air control valve on this motor, at about $80, is more expensive than most. For that reason, I would thoroughly clean it at this time, rather than replacing it. But it might be worthwhile to also test the electrical circuit which activates it. You might be able to make a simple test of the activation mechanism by listening at the valve or pressing a finger to it while someone turns the ignition key to the position where the dashboard warning lights come on. If you feel or hear the valve click when the key is turned on; that would be a reassuring event, although it does not guarantee that the internal parts of the valve are functioning. But it still will need cleaning. If there is no sound when the key is turned on; that would not necessarily condemn the valve; but it would still leave it suspect in the event that no other problem was found.

    The fuel injection throttle body should definitely be cleaned; preferably by using Valvoline Syn Power throttle body cleaner, while paying particular attention to clearing any small openings, and removing all traces of deposits from BOTH sides of the throttle butterfly and the bore in which it seats.

    If the above measures do not correct the problem; I would replace the camshaft position sensor and the crankshaft position sensor.

    I'd be interested in your feedback on this process.

  • zaken1 02/23/10 5:00 pm PST

    There is one other possible cause for this problem, which didn't occur to me when I wrote the above response: The EGR valve may be stuck open. If replacing the spark plugs does not fix it; the EGR valve is the next thing I would check.

  • roger71 02/23/10 9:19 pm PST

    thaks for assistance i gonna try sparks plug first.. what did yo mean when you say replace cranshaft position sencor And cranshaft position sencor is that one thing. [thanks for your time]

  • zaken1 02/24/10 2:22 am PST

    There are three different rotating shafts inside the motor. One is called the crankshaft, and the other two are called camshafts. The crankshaft is in the bottom half of the motor, and is supported by the main bearings and is attached to the connecting rods. The two camshafts on your SOHC (single overhead camshaft) motor are in the top of each of the cylinder heads, and serve to open and close the valves. There is a magnetic sensor mounted in the engine which measures the position of the crankshaft as it rotates; and another magnetic sensor which measures the position of the camshafts as they rotate. These two sensors are called the crankshaft position sensor, and the camshaft position sensor. These two sensors are electrically connected to the engine control computer. If one of those sensors goes bad; it will cause the engine to stall intermittently, and to be difficult to restart. The two sensors are different from each other; but they each cost $25 to $40. They are easy to change; because they are each held in by one bolt, and are connected to an electrical plug. Here is a link to a photo of the camshaft position sensor:  http://www.rockauto.com/catalog/moreinf
    o...
     and here is a different link to a photo of the crankshaft position sensor: http://www.rockauto.com/catalog/moreinf
    o...
    . You will need a service manual to see where those two sensors are found on the engine. You could just change one of those sensors, and see if that fixes the problem. If it fixes it; there is no need to change the other one. Some auto parts stores may be able to test those sensors, which could save you from having to buy one without knowing if the old one was bad or not.

  • roger71 02/28/10 6:06 pm PST

    could it be my ignition question

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