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  • avatar zaken1 04/09/10 11:34 pm PST

    Well, whoever told you that it could be a crankshaft position sensor didn't bother to find out whether 1994 Toyota Corollas even have a crankshaft position sensor. If they'd checked; they would have found out that this car does not have a crankshaft position sensor. Free automotive advice is often only worth what you pay for it (and sometimes ends up wasting a bunch of your money).

    In order to not waste any more of my time or your money; I'll need to know the engine size or model that is in your car (1.6 liter 4AFE; or 1.8 liter 7AFE). I'd also like to know a few other things; such as 1> How many miles are on the car. 2> How long have you owned it? 3> Has the timing belt ever been changed while you've owned this car? If so; when, or at what mileage? 4> Did you get a used distributor or a new or remanufactured one? 5> How did you check for spark? 6> Did the motor just quit suddenly; or did it give some problems and gradually run worse and worse until it stopped?

    The more completely you can answer these questions; the more effectively I can sort out this problem.

    I'd also like to ask you to check something for me: Remove the distributor cap, and watch the distributor rotor while someone cranks the starter. If the distributor rotor does not turn while the starter runs; this means the timing belt has broken. The distributor is turned by a series of parts, which are driven from the timing belt. If the distributor does not turn; it cannot produce sparks; and the engine will not start or run. The factory recommended mileage interval for changing the timing belt on this car is every 60,000 miles. If the timing belt is not changed at the recommended mileage; it will eventually break without warning. This can leave you stranded thousands of miles from home; but it is totally preventable, if you just read and follow the instructions in the owner's manual. This information is in the owner's manual because people are not born knowing it; and their neighbors who tell them about camshaft position sensors probably have never heard of a timing belt. So people who drive a car without making sure to get and to read the owner's manual are likely to end up faced with problems like this.

Answers

  • zaken1 04/09/10 11:34 pm PST

    Well, whoever told you that it could be a crankshaft position sensor didn't bother to find out whether 1994 Toyota Corollas even have a crankshaft position sensor. If they'd checked; they would have found out that this car does not have a crankshaft position sensor. Free automotive advice is often only worth what you pay for it (and sometimes ends up wasting a bunch of your money).

    In order to not waste any more of my time or your money; I'll need to know the engine size or model that is in your car (1.6 liter 4AFE; or 1.8 liter 7AFE). I'd also like to know a few other things; such as 1> How many miles are on the car. 2> How long have you owned it? 3> Has the timing belt ever been changed while you've owned this car? If so; when, or at what mileage? 4> Did you get a used distributor or a new or remanufactured one? 5> How did you check for spark? 6> Did the motor just quit suddenly; or did it give some problems and gradually run worse and worse until it stopped?

    The more completely you can answer these questions; the more effectively I can sort out this problem.

    I'd also like to ask you to check something for me: Remove the distributor cap, and watch the distributor rotor while someone cranks the starter. If the distributor rotor does not turn while the starter runs; this means the timing belt has broken. The distributor is turned by a series of parts, which are driven from the timing belt. If the distributor does not turn; it cannot produce sparks; and the engine will not start or run. The factory recommended mileage interval for changing the timing belt on this car is every 60,000 miles. If the timing belt is not changed at the recommended mileage; it will eventually break without warning. This can leave you stranded thousands of miles from home; but it is totally preventable, if you just read and follow the instructions in the owner's manual. This information is in the owner's manual because people are not born knowing it; and their neighbors who tell them about camshaft position sensors probably have never heard of a timing belt. So people who drive a car without making sure to get and to read the owner's manual are likely to end up faced with problems like this.

  • Stever@Edmunds 04/10/10 9:19 pm PST

    You can reply in this thread by clicking the Answer this Question button and that will help keep all the information in one spot. Thanks!

  • zaken1 04/11/10 12:36 am PST

    Hi again. I received a notice about your new question; but all I was able to see was the title, because that question has been deleted. You see; they are very strict here about not allowing responses to be posted as a new topic. All responses and feedback from you or anyone else to your original question must only be posted in this thread (by clicking the "answer this question" button at the bottom of the discussion). You can post more information here even after a question has been marked "closed."

    So all I know about your response is that the timing belt was changed about 10,000 miles ago, the car has 170,000 total miles on it, and the distributor you got was a second hand unit. But I don't know what you were asking. I would guess you're writing because the distributor rotor does spin when the starter runs; but that is not something which can be assumed just because it has only run for 10,000 miles. So I need to know whether you removed the cap and checked to see if the rotor spins. If you didn't check it; please do so. Please also tell me exactly how you checked for sparks from the distributor. I also need to know whether you own or have access to a voltmeter, and whether it also has current measuring capability (with a 10 amp scale). Thank you.

  • dennisdc 09/10/10 7:55 pm PST

    They eat coils.

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