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  • zaken1 03/19/09 11:33 am PST

    When checking for spark from a dual outlet coil of this type; you need to check for a spark between the two plug wires; not between one wire and ground. Unlike a single outlet coil, in which the low side of the secondary winding is internally grounded; dual outlet coils are made from a single specially wound coil, which has each end of the secondary winding connected to an outlet. These coils fire from both outlets at the same time; with one outlet firing in negative polarity and the other outlet firing in positive polarity. There is no ground path for the spark to return to the coil in this arrangement. The spark returns to the coil through the second plug wire.

    Because the entire secondary winding is insulated from ground; if you try to check for spark on just one wire, by grounding one side of the spark plug tester, the spark current tries to return to the coil by arcing through the secondary insulation between the coil winding and the core. This can cause internal shorts in the coil insulation, or can break down the insulation between winding layers. It also places an abnormally high voltage across the icm; which can lead to failure of either the icm or other components and sensors which connect to the ignition circuit.

    But in answer to your question; both the camshaft and crankshaft position sensors can go bad and cause a no start problem. They also can both be tested. The camshaft position sensor is more likely to cause this problem.

    Before you remove or test any additional parts, I would strongly suggest you check to see if the timing chain has broken or jumped out of sync. If the timing chain broke; it would cause a no spark condition. It would also cause abnormally low cylinder compression readings; so running a compression test on all the cylinders would be an easy way to test for a broken chain. Another test would be to take off the valve cover (or look into the valve cover through the oil filler cap, if that is possible) and see if the rocker arms move while the engine is cranking.


  • karjunkie 03/19/09 11:34 am PST

    I'd suspect the camshaft position sensor as the main culprit. However, it could be a bad relay or ignition switch. I suggest you buy or borrow an OBD II scanner and see what codes come up. Otherwise, you will be spending a lot of $$$$$ on unecessary parts. A simple scanner will only run you 50 bucks so it's worth the investment.

  • renegade65 01/01/13 10:09 pm PST

    1995 2.2L OHV do not have a CMP

  • renegade65 01/01/13 10:20 pm PST

    its crankshaft position sensor CKP

  • renegade65 01/02/13 5:13 pm PST

    yes crankshaft position sensor is bad

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