Edmunds Answers

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  • avatar morin2 05/02/10 1:24 pm PST

    I can see where my answer could be viewed as a wise guy response to your concerns, so I apologize for the flippancy (if that is even a word). I suspect that you're kicking yourself for missing things that you should have checked yourself - like the date of manufacture. I've never had a salesman point out the date of manufacture. After the sale, you are pretty much stuck with the deal you struck - unless there are some mathematical errors in the contract. I'd focus at this point on the positives - you got what you wanted and it has had some great reviews.

    I think "Customer Service" is viewed as a necessary evil by large businesses and no longer an opportunity to solve problems and build good will. The only thing that's important is the sale today - not any future business. Most customer service calls now go to India (don't know where Ford's calls go). Its amazing that they can answer anything at all about products they've never seen and will never have a chance to own. I think the customer service motto might be "talk soothingly, tell them what they want to hear, and eventually they go away".

    I put myself in the salesman's shoes when I visit the dealership. His job is to sell what's on the lot - and they are often under great pressure to do just that.

    Enjoy the new ride! Use this experience to check the date of items at the bakery!

Answers

  • morin2 05/01/10 1:49 pm PST

    New models are often introduced early. Did someone hold a gun to your head to force you to sign the contract at full MSRP?

    "New" does not mean freshly manufactured. It means "not previously registered". The date of manufacture is on the car and not hidden. If you want freshly made, you have to look at the manufacture date, same as with any product.

  • karjunkie 05/01/10 1:51 pm PST

    If it's never been registered, it is "new". If it is a 2010 model, it could have been built months ago, that is not unusual. That you paid sticker for the car is not the fault of the dealer. I can't really see where you have any kind of claim on this car. It's gotten great reviews and I have not seen any dealer willing to sell one at much of a discount. Do you really expect Alan Mullay to personally deal with the issue? That's simply not a reasonable expectation my friend! I sympathize with your frustration, but that is why big corporations have a Customer Service group.

  • MrShift@Edmunds 05/01/10 2:08 pm PST

    Since the car is a legitimate 2010 model with, we presume, no or few miles, I don't see how you are aggreived in any way. You have the same resale value as a Fusion built recently and everyone's NAV system goes out of date as soon as the topography changes, be it in a Fusion or a Rolls Royce.

    If I were you, I'd relax and enjoy your new car, and just buy the NAV update when it's available.

  • Stever@Edmunds 05/01/10 3:33 pm PST

    Even if you had Mr. Mulally's email, your message would most likely be screened and routed to a customer service rep to handle.

    I do understand your frustration. The car sat in storage somewhere until it was sent to the dealers, and it sat on the dealer's lot for months. Someone likely idled it every week or two to keep the battery from going down. The battery is a year old before ever having been put into service. It's unlikely that any fluids were changed either, so the motor oil sat around and may have gotten condensation in it from that idling.

    Tires have a shelf life too, and yours are a year old (and they haven't been nicely stored in bags out of the elements either). I don't think cars do well sitting around - it's better to use them.

    If there is a new navigation disk out, I'd demand the update. I'd want an early oil and filter change too. A parts store can check out your battery levels. It would be a good idea to change the brake fluid in a year.

    Maybe the dealer would do more than give you a silly grin if you complain to the BBB and your local consumer protection agency.

    Source: 

  • boomchek 05/01/10 3:35 pm PST

    The dealer represented this as new because it was new. Previously unregistered is considered new whether it was sitting on the lot for 1 day or even 3 years.

    Your warranty also started the day you purchased your vehicle, not the day they built it, so I wouldn't worry about it as you're not missing a year's worth of warranty.

    Your 2010 Fusion Hybird built 12 months ago is still the same as any other new 2010 Fusion Hybird built yesterday and looks and drives the same as well.

    Enjoy your vehicle!

  • jrock6 05/02/10 11:11 am PST

    Thanks for the responses. Considered ones and wise guys both. No I don't think Alan is coming to my house to apologize, and nobody held a gun to my head. I checked the whole region for a Fusion hybrid and dealer after dealer said. "Can't take but a few hundred off sticker, cause we can't get enough of them." Also there are several upgrades on the later made 2010's. But the corker is my naivete not knowing we could just order a 2011, and the salesman who apparently wanted to dump his old stock keeping his mouth shut and not letting on that there was that option. I'm retired and have bought many a new car or truck, and never got one made 12 months before. So if I live long enough to buy another one I'm flinging the door open and checking the date first thing. Best Regards.

    P.S. Yesterday afternoon I got a call from the Dealer. They are offering to pay the $200 plus shipping for the Navteq map update. It's better than nothing.

  • karjunkie 05/02/10 11:40 am PST

    FWIW, I wasn't trying to be a wiseacre. The fact is that Mullaly would most probably just shuffle you off to customer service as that is their job. Custom ordering these days is not like the old days. 40 years ago everyone special ordered their cars and options were available individually from the order sheet. Then the Japanese invented the dreaded option packages, so that you couldn't really get exactly what you wanted. This resulted in most people buying cars off the lot with popular options that were available. I suspect to special order a car today, a dealer will demand a healthy down payment and ask for full MSRP because 95% of people do not special order their cars. Enjoy your new car!

  • jrock6 05/02/10 12:13 pm PST

    Karjunkie, I never thought about the packages, but your right. Times change, I guess it's like I use to be able to tear down and rebuild a flathead, but I have trouble finding the spark plugs on the new engines. As far as Ford customer service, believe me they are useless. They have a book they read out of, and if it's not in there they have no clue. They will sympathize with you almost to the point of calling the dealer a crook, but can't do a darn thing for you. I found that out before I bought the car. Called to see if there were any rebates, etc. Was told emphatically that there was $2000 off plus Zero financing and given the code numbers. Found out that was not the case, and when I called back the guy started reading it to me like I was pretty dumb and wasting his time. But when he got to the bottom he said oops.. it's for the Fusion, but in the small print it says, not the Hybrid.. Sorry. That's about how the 4 calls to them have gone after the sale... Regards.

  • MrShift@Edmunds 05/02/10 1:21 pm PST

    I think part of your struggle here is a misunderstanding of the Ford--Dealership relationship. The dealers are independent franchises and can pretty much do business as they wish. The chance of them being chastised by the factory are pretty slim if they play fast and loose in the selling arena. The factory-dealer relationship often borders on the antagonistic, or at least the adversarial. If you think that Ford and its dealers are "cosy", think again about that.

    It seems to me, on the face of it, that your complaint is with the dealership, not with Ford at all.

    I think you are mad at the wrong people here. At least that's my two cents about it.




  • morin2 05/02/10 1:24 pm PST

    I can see where my answer could be viewed as a wise guy response to your concerns, so I apologize for the flippancy (if that is even a word). I suspect that you're kicking yourself for missing things that you should have checked yourself - like the date of manufacture. I've never had a salesman point out the date of manufacture. After the sale, you are pretty much stuck with the deal you struck - unless there are some mathematical errors in the contract. I'd focus at this point on the positives - you got what you wanted and it has had some great reviews.

    I think "Customer Service" is viewed as a necessary evil by large businesses and no longer an opportunity to solve problems and build good will. The only thing that's important is the sale today - not any future business. Most customer service calls now go to India (don't know where Ford's calls go). Its amazing that they can answer anything at all about products they've never seen and will never have a chance to own. I think the customer service motto might be "talk soothingly, tell them what they want to hear, and eventually they go away".

    I put myself in the salesman's shoes when I visit the dealership. His job is to sell what's on the lot - and they are often under great pressure to do just that.

    Enjoy the new ride! Use this experience to check the date of items at the bakery!

  • Stever@Edmunds 05/02/10 4:46 pm PST

    Glad to hear you are at least getting a Nav update partially paid for.

    Please write a review about your dealer experiences too.

    Dealer Ratings and Reviews

  • jrock6 05/02/10 9:18 pm PST

    I have to agree with everyone. Even though I was prepared as far as price and locating all the features my wife wanted. (I told her we would have to drive the thing for 10 years to recoup the cost of the car in gas savings) but you know how that goes. Anyway it's what she wanted and a very nice car. Now for the real problem. She had a 2001 DTS Caddy that is Jet black with 90,000 miles on a Northstar and originally listed for $54,000 and looks and drives like new. I did not trade it in because they wanted to steal it for $4,000. Now we have the Caddy, a 2007 Mustang convertible with 28,000 miles on it, a GMC 3/4 ton with 60,000 miles on it and the Fusion. I like all of them and feel like a pack rat. Which one would you part with?? I know, I know, we should all have such problems, but they have all been stored under roof and it's getting a little crowded. Great talking to you all.

  • morin2 05/02/10 10:32 pm PST

    That's only four cars. I think we're told when we have too many, and until then, its best not to even think in those terms. My wife once told me I had too many boats in the house, garage, and barn, and that's how I knew. I didn't think it was possible to "have too many boats". So I sold about 6 kayaks and now I don't hear any more about that.

    I've also got four, with one being driven by my youngest, who will leave for college 500 miles away in August, so we'll be back to four for two drivers, plus another for my oldest who just bought a new Honda Element and will be coming home to manage a business after college. So we'll have five here. I'm out of room for building more barns and garages.

    The three cars that you mention are all highly desireable vehicles. I suspect I'd try to keep them all - until someone told me there were "too many". Then I'd have to ask her which one was too many after protecting my top draft choice - the pickup (unless you are close to me in MD, in which case you should sell me the pickup, as I only have one). In seriousness, the Mustang probably has the most value and would be an easy sale at a time of year when convertibles bring the highest price (now). But its also your only convertible, so a case could easily be made to keep it. This is a very tough decision and should probably be discussed over beers. Good luck!

  • Stever@Edmunds 05/03/10 12:55 am PST

    You don't own stuff, it owns you. :-)

    With cars, you have to park them somewhere, and if you drive them, you have to keep the registration and tags current and insure them. If you let them sit too long, you'll have to jump start them or at least run a trickle charger for a while. Stuff like batteries die with age and tires, depending on who you ask, are stale after 5 or 6 years.

    I'd price them out using True Market Value and dump every one but the new Ford. I'd start with the Caddy but I don't like the idea of trying to keep a black car clean. Save the convertible if you need a backup ride. Let someone enjoy the rest of them for a while.

    (Morin2, I'm finally down to one canoe, lol).

  • karjunkie 05/03/10 7:22 am PST

    Wow, am I the wrong guy to ask about that! To me, 4 cars is perfectly normal. But if you had to sell one, I'd say it is the Caddy. The pickup is a great practical thing to have around for those projects that never end and I regret selling the last one I had. The Mustang is a great weekend or vacation car.

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