Edmunds Answers

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  • avatar zaken1 02/04/10 12:39 am PST

    By crossing the cables, you have either blown out one or more main fuses and/or blown the alternator diodes. I believe the main fuses are located in or next to the positive battery cable connector on that car. One or more blown main fuses would be the direct cause for the power not getting to most of the circuits; but if the alternator diodes have also been damaged; it will cause the fuse or fuses to blow again when they are replaced. In that case, the alternator would have to be replaced. If you disconnect the battery ground cable, and also disconnect the heavy power cable from the alternator, and then install new fuses; when you reconnect the battery ground cable while leaving the alternator power cable off (and securely wrapped in a rag so it cannot touch any metal objects) it should restore power to the car's electrical system. If you then disconnect a battery cable, and connect the power cable back to the alternator, and after that find that the fuse(s) blows when the battery is reconnected; this proves that the alternator diodes are bad. But if there is no problem when you reconnect the battery; then the alternator diodes have apparently escaped injury.

Answers

  • zaken1 02/04/10 12:39 am PST

    By crossing the cables, you have either blown out one or more main fuses and/or blown the alternator diodes. I believe the main fuses are located in or next to the positive battery cable connector on that car. One or more blown main fuses would be the direct cause for the power not getting to most of the circuits; but if the alternator diodes have also been damaged; it will cause the fuse or fuses to blow again when they are replaced. In that case, the alternator would have to be replaced. If you disconnect the battery ground cable, and also disconnect the heavy power cable from the alternator, and then install new fuses; when you reconnect the battery ground cable while leaving the alternator power cable off (and securely wrapped in a rag so it cannot touch any metal objects) it should restore power to the car's electrical system. If you then disconnect a battery cable, and connect the power cable back to the alternator, and after that find that the fuse(s) blows when the battery is reconnected; this proves that the alternator diodes are bad. But if there is no problem when you reconnect the battery; then the alternator diodes have apparently escaped injury.

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