Edmunds Answers

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  • avatar MrShift@Edmunds 07/09/11 12:15 pm PST

    Well the code doesn't tell you what part to replace if that's what you mean. All these computer codes do is tell you which circuit or system is in distress. You'll have to either get a workshop manual, or subscribe to ALLDATA DIY and get yourself a scanner, in order to fix it properly.


    Here's what's going on in general terms: (see below)

    But your problem could be bad wiring, a bad CMP sensor, or a bad ECM module.

    System Description
    The Camshaft Position (CMP) Sensor is used to correlate crankshaft to camshaft position so that the Engine Control Module (ECM) can determine which cylinder is ready to be fueled by the injector. The CMP is also used to determine which cylinder is misfiring when a misfire is present. When the ECM cannot use the information from the CMP sensor, a Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC) is set, and the ECM will fuel the engine using the Alternating Synchronous Double Fire (ASDF) method.

    Conditions for Setting the DTC

    • CMP Sensor pulse is not detected at the correct interval every 4 cylinders.
    • Engine is running.

    Action Taken When the DTC Sets

    • The Malfunction Indicator Lamp (MIL) will illuminate.
    • The ECM will record operating conditions at the time the diagnostic fails. This information will be stored in the Freeze Frame and Failure Records buffers.
    • A history DTC is stored.

    Conditions for Clearing the MIL/DTC

    • The MIL will turn off after four consecutive ignition cycles in which the diagnostic runs without a fault.
    • A history DTC will clear after 40 consecutive warm-up cycles without a fault.
    • DTC(s) can be cleared by using the scan tool.
    • Disconnecting the ECM battery feed for more than 10 seconds .

    Diagnostic Aids
    An intermittent problem may be caused by a poor connection, rubbed-through wire insulation, or a wire that is broken inside the insulation. Any circuitry, that is suspected as causing the complaint, should be thoroughly checked for the following conditions:

    • Backed-out terminals
    • Improper mating
    • Broken locks
    • Improperly formed
    • Damaged terminals
    • Poor terminal-to-wire connection
    • Physical damage to the wiring harness

    To replace the sensor, you have to remove the engine cover and the timing case cover to unbolt it.

    The parts and labor rate are $55 for the part (retail) and 1.4 hours labor.

    So if you want to take a blind shot, you could have a shop replace the CPS for you for maybe $200 ??

    If you sign up for ALL DATA for $26 a year, they'll show you how to do it yourself, but again, without going through a full diagnostic "tree", you're just guessing.


Answers

  • MrShift@Edmunds 07/09/11 12:15 pm PST

    Well the code doesn't tell you what part to replace if that's what you mean. All these computer codes do is tell you which circuit or system is in distress. You'll have to either get a workshop manual, or subscribe to ALLDATA DIY and get yourself a scanner, in order to fix it properly.


    Here's what's going on in general terms: (see below)

    But your problem could be bad wiring, a bad CMP sensor, or a bad ECM module.

    System Description
    The Camshaft Position (CMP) Sensor is used to correlate crankshaft to camshaft position so that the Engine Control Module (ECM) can determine which cylinder is ready to be fueled by the injector. The CMP is also used to determine which cylinder is misfiring when a misfire is present. When the ECM cannot use the information from the CMP sensor, a Diagnostic Trouble Code (DTC) is set, and the ECM will fuel the engine using the Alternating Synchronous Double Fire (ASDF) method.

    Conditions for Setting the DTC

    • CMP Sensor pulse is not detected at the correct interval every 4 cylinders.
    • Engine is running.

    Action Taken When the DTC Sets

    • The Malfunction Indicator Lamp (MIL) will illuminate.
    • The ECM will record operating conditions at the time the diagnostic fails. This information will be stored in the Freeze Frame and Failure Records buffers.
    • A history DTC is stored.

    Conditions for Clearing the MIL/DTC

    • The MIL will turn off after four consecutive ignition cycles in which the diagnostic runs without a fault.
    • A history DTC will clear after 40 consecutive warm-up cycles without a fault.
    • DTC(s) can be cleared by using the scan tool.
    • Disconnecting the ECM battery feed for more than 10 seconds .

    Diagnostic Aids
    An intermittent problem may be caused by a poor connection, rubbed-through wire insulation, or a wire that is broken inside the insulation. Any circuitry, that is suspected as causing the complaint, should be thoroughly checked for the following conditions:

    • Backed-out terminals
    • Improper mating
    • Broken locks
    • Improperly formed
    • Damaged terminals
    • Poor terminal-to-wire connection
    • Physical damage to the wiring harness

    To replace the sensor, you have to remove the engine cover and the timing case cover to unbolt it.

    The parts and labor rate are $55 for the part (retail) and 1.4 hours labor.

    So if you want to take a blind shot, you could have a shop replace the CPS for you for maybe $200 ??

    If you sign up for ALL DATA for $26 a year, they'll show you how to do it yourself, but again, without going through a full diagnostic "tree", you're just guessing.


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