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  • obyone 01/06/10 7:25 pm PST

    The rubber belt is deteriorating from the heat produce by the engine. 7 years/110K miles? I thought it was less. Anyway, the downside is that you have an interference engine which means should the belt break you will have a $2-$3K repair bill on your hands versus the few hundred to change the timing belt and water pump.

  • hmag 01/06/10 7:57 pm PST

    I have a 1999 Honda CRV, model ex. purchased Feb. 1999 with 90,000. I had the timing belt changed Jan 5, 2010. The removed timing belt appeared in like new condition with no discernable deterioration. My shop manual (not owners manual) specifications for maintenance calls for replacement at 8 years or 105,000 miles, whichever comes first. The shop manual further states in the inspectio;n section that if external cracks or oil on the the belt is observed, replacement is in order. The repair shop who replaced my timing belt stated that the external appearance of my old belt was typical. He advised me to bend the belt at the cogs and inspect for cracks; I did not see any. He also stated that the belt would fail from the inside. I would think that the interior of the belt is where it is the strongest. Its a relatively easy job to remove the valve cover and inspsect the belt, with yoiur cost being a vavle cover gasket. It the belt snaps, and some do, engine damage will result. What happens is that without the timing belt the pistons slam into the valves causing damage. The damage I have been told by the mechanics can be minimum or major. Minor repair costs estimated at $1500 to major cost of engine replacement. There is no way to predict with certainty belt failure. I was pushing it with the years and miles on my vehicle. The repair cost was $623.02 and that inncluded replacing the oil in the rear differential. When the timing belt is replaced, a new water pump is installed, all external drive belts, antifreeze and a new valve cover gasket. The cost of the repair is about 13 percent of the value of the car. Think of the repair as insurance against a catastrophic failure. Whatever your decision, Good Luck. Hal

  • hmag 01/06/10 8:00 pm PST

    I have a 1999 Honda CRV, model ex. purchased Feb. 1999 with 90,000. I had the timing belt changed Jan 5, 2010. The removed timing belt appeared in like new condition with no discernable deterioration. My shop manual (not owners manual) specifications for maintenance calls for replacement at 8 years or 105,000 miles, whichever comes first. The shop manual further states in the inspection section that if external cracks or oil on the the belt is observed, replacement is in order. The repair shop who replaced my timing belt stated that the external appearance of my old belt was typical. He advised me to bend the belt at the cogs and inspect for cracks; I did not see any. He also stated that the belt would fail from the inside. I would think that the interior of the belt is where it is the strongest. Its a relatively easy job to remove the valve cover and inspsect the belt, with yoiur cost being a valve cover gasket. It the belt snaps, and some do, engine damage will result. What happens is that without the timing belt the pistons slam into the valves causing damage. The damage I have been told by the mechanics can be minimum or major. Minor repair costs estimated at $1500 to major cost of engine replacement. There is no way to predict with certainty belt failure. I was pushing it with the years and miles on my vehicle. The repair cost was $623.02 and that inncluded replacing the oil in the rear differential. When the timing belt is replaced, a new water pump is installed, all external drive belts, antifreeze and a new valve cover gasket. The cost of the repair is about 13 percent of the value of the car. Think of the repair as insurance against a catastrophic failure. Whatever your decision, Good Luck. Hal

  • isellhondas 01/06/10 8:05 pm PST

    Actually, it's 7 years or 105,000 miles and I wouldn't push it.

    When they replace the timing belt, they will probably reccomend that you change the water pump, drive belts and the seals too. Sometimes a seal will start leaking and for all you know, that timing belt could be soaking in oil.

    So, the question becomes as Dirty Hary said..." Do ya feel lucky?"

    I don't think I would rush right down to have it replaced but I know I wouldn't wait too much longer.

    It is an interefence engine and if snaps, it might do some engine damage such as bending some valves. Sometimes people get lucky and nothing gets damaged but not everybody is that lucky.

    If you're on a tight budget you could probably delay this job until you save up and with those miles you could probably skip the water pump.

  • multiplexguru 01/07/10 12:27 am PST

    Ok I researched this more closely.....

    According to 9 reports of broken belts on internet forums, all of them were either 12 years or older at the time the belt broke. The average was 16 with a standard deviation of 3.85.

    Basically it suggests that 99% of belts last 10+ years, 95% last 12+ years, and 68% last 14+ years.

    So a 1 in 100 chance that the belt will break in less than 10 years means that I can divide the cost to repair by 1% if I play the odds... Say it is $2000 to repair when timing belt breaks... that means it costs $20 to self insure, and an insurance company would probably make a lot charging $40 to insure it for you. The price to pay the dealer is $400-600 to insure against it. Certainly not cheap insurance (preventive maint.) If seems to make sense to change it at 12 years, but only if I plan on keeping it longer than 15-16 years.

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