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  • texases 03/26/11 8:58 pm PST

    Guaranteed scam. $69 for a chip is nonsense. If a chip could do that the makers (who know a lot more about their cars) would have done it already. The sure giveaway is that chips are available for every car out there, Hondas to Bentlys. Right, they've done the complex development work needed for every car made. Not likely!

  • zaken1 03/26/11 9:16 pm PST

    I have not personally used one of their products; but after looking over their website; it looks to me like they are really producing a product that is honestly represented. There are few, if any, other manufacturers who sell a chip for under $100 which lives up to its claims. But I think this is a good one.


    I have contacted the company about a chip for a different application. If they respond favorably, I'll buy one for myself. If their response raises warning flags with me; I'll post that information in this thread. I should know within a few days.

  • zaken1 03/27/11 3:21 am PST

    I received a response from G Force about my inquiry; and I am VERY disappointed with what they said. My 1.0 liter Geo Metro has a 60 horsepower motor; and the sales representative told me that their "chip" would add more than 30 horespower. But I also read on their website that the chip just connects to the intake air temperature sensor. The only thing this kind of device can do is to richen up the fuel mixture; it cannot change the ignition timing, nor can changing the mixture increase the power anywhere near the amount that they claim. That would be more than a 50% power increase; which is virtually impossible for a device which just richens the fuel mixture.

    The instructions say that it only connects with 2 wires; but the photo on their site shows a real chip that has a 14 pin connector on one side (and probably has 14 more pins on the other side). But a 14 or 28 pin chip does not connect to two wires; it connects to 14 or 28 wires. So this is a scam, period.

    This is a cheap device that costs the manufacturer a few bucks (if that much) to produce. Just think; since they make at least $65 profit on each unit; if 8 out of every ten people who buy them return the products for a refund; they will still make $130 combined profit on the two units which are not returned; even after refunding the price of 8 out of ten. This is how they can offer such a good guarantee. It is a proven fact that many people will not bother to return an item that they buy; even if it doesn't work. And THAT is how these people make their money. They know it doesn't work, and they also know that extravagant claims and outright lies will pull buyers in anyway.

  • smitz327e 04/29/12 9:59 am PST

    I called GForce to ask a question about wether the engine check light would come on if I installed the chip. I got a response and the salesman said it is possible. That was it it, 3 words. Doesn't sound good to me because I expected more.

  • elias 04/29/12 11:41 am PST

    It is entirely possible and easy to believe that GForce or any other reputable company has various/valid/effective ECM programs available for the various GM engines including the 2.4 in Equinox. These can 'work' when measured by any single metric or small set of metrics. Techniques used reverse-engineering/reprogramming older ECMs models can be quickly applied to newer ECMs.

    There is no free lunch, and this will be apparent if "all" metrics are applied comparing one ECM program to another.
    For example: if a new program increases mpg and power a tiny bit, then (very likely) it will make emissions worse and/or reduce catalytic-converter-lifetime.
    Everything is a tradeoff in ECM programming in the real world - you can't improve one thing without making 19 other things worse.

    For significant performance increases, hardware swaps are also required for basically any factory engine. In those cases , both power and mpg can be increased compared to factory. There's always a tradeoff/downside however. For example: more power & torque will reduce lifetime of other driveline parts unless they were race-parts to begin with.

    The idea of trying to get more performance with a new ECM chip in an Equinox 2.4 engine is silly and bad. In a GEO metro the idea is patently absurd and off-the-chart in its exquisite badness. Don't do it.

  • jerrykp 07/10/12 1:37 pm PST

    I just had a Gforce Chip installed in my 2010 Mercedes GLK350. It's still to early to tell about the fuel mileage claims. I'm only getting 16 mpg out of it but am hoping for at least 19. We will see. They say it takes 100 miles for the chip to program and I only have 50. But it sure does seem to have some more HP...it screams. I've spoken to Tech support at GForce a couple of times and they are a good company! Seem like stand up guys to me. Quick response time and very helpful.

  • Stever@Edmunds 07/10/12 4:05 pm PST

    Without some before and after testing data, like on a dynometer, seat of the pants "feel" is just...well seat of the pants feel. :-)

    For more HP and 3 more mpgs, I'm sure the manufacturers would be all over this stuff if it worked. The CAFE benefits for meeting fleet averages would easily pay for the licensing fees even if they had to pay a third party for the programming. Shoot, they'd probably pay for a tenth of a mile per gallon increase.

    Source: 

  • mechfor 01/14/13 2:37 am PST

    After reading the answers provided earlier, I thought I would comment:
    Nothing I read here was really tested, mostly surmising and educated guessing.
    No offense, guys...and I realize you are trying to save someone money from an unwise purchase.
    But, here are some facts:
    1.) TO meet the 7 mode, 7 cycle EPA test standards manufacturers DO retard timing and richen the mixture to heat the catalytic converter to operational temperature quickly to meet COLD START emission standards. Some older cars kept this retarded timing when AT operational temperatures giving less than optimal mpg AND power.
    IF this device does what it says it does (btw, "just 2 wires to plug in" that are actually 28 wire connectors at each end is STILL just 2 connections to make and doesn't a scam make) it could increase gas mileage and power.
    Does it work? I don't know.
    Could it work? From working on cars for 40 years, yes, it could work. I would have to go through a schematic of the connections made to see what it was actually interfacing with before I could say whether it even has a chance of working though.
    Someone needs to have the to try it, as ANY connections or alterations could have a disastrous effect on the engine as well as beneficial.
    The "safe" answer without real tests is don't buy it.


    Source: 

  • scadarick 03/28/13 3:46 pm PST

    Not real sure about this chip, I bought a high performance chip and replaced the factory chip, it was already out of warenty anyway, so the good news is that it did a great job increasing my hp as well as my fuel, on the highway yes, in town about the same, but I put a couple of thrust masters on it added about 25 hp as well as the chip...had it put on a dyno and sure enough, that chip was my hp to 335. I have a custom 2001 tahoe, built on a k5 frame. 5.2 engine. Airbag susp, alen Bradley tranny, 2 alternators, going to add 2 more. I will never sell this tahoe, it's my 4th one, in 2003 I got the chance to buy the 2001 custom tahoe...so I went back a few years, glad I did, the truck to day only has 9300 miles, been replacing carpet, head liner, front dash, but still working on that. I guess my point is...I paid 156.00 for my chip and new injectors high quality ones. So paying 56 dollars does not sound right...2 wires, come on..no way can it control the on board computer better than my 14 prong chip, not to meantion high quality injectors!

  • fusionpilot 12/03/13 10:19 am PST

    I agree with the earlier posts mentioning "tradeoffs".


    I once put a chip in a Saab 9000 Turbo. It really boosted the power, by allowing turbo over-boost which the basic system did not. I recall it allowed full boost for 15 seconds where the stock system only allowed momentary (a second) overboost.

    Power was amazing - but the tradeoff occurred after a few weeks - I blew the turbo.

    What about the GForce? If it leans out the mixture, you will, at best, get the check engine light, because lean mixtures burn hotter which increase pollution. Further, they can create hot spots in the engine and burn valves and pistons if left uncorrected.

    If under load it increases fuel, it creates more pollution as well, and can, if rich enough, allow unburned fuel to seep down the sides of the pistons and contaminate the oil. With today's longer oil change intervals, this can lead to excess engine wear, which you will not notice for a few years, but is uncorrectable.

    Finally, the electronics in these vehicles are extremely sophisticated. Voltages must be maintained very accurately, and the cars contain power conditioning circuits to do this. Anyone who hooks into the main data buss on the car risks voltage spikes and outright destruction of sensitive components.

    If your manufacturer doesn't allow the upgrade (all of them have approved after-market parts which have been tested), then stay away. If you have a 15 year old beater and you want to experiment, then try it out and if it trashes the ECU, junk the car.

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