Edmunds Answers

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  • avatar zaken1 10/13/08 12:27 am PST

    If the battery were fully charged every two weeks (because the current draw of the computer will drain the battery in less than a month) there would be no damage done to the battery. However, in the real world, dealers seldom charge batteries as often as they should. As a result, if you buy a car that has sat on the lot for a long time, the battery will probably be compromised, and will not last long after you get it. I would demand that a new battery be installed, before I would buy such a car.

    Lifter noise is not nice to hear; it suggests that oil has drained down from critical parts. In a new engine which has not yet been broken in; this can result in more damage than it does in a fully broken in engine. Excessive camshaft wear is one of the likely consequences.

    Because the first hundred miles are the most critical, in determining the engine's ultimate level of performance, I would never buy a car that has been used as a demonstrator; and was driven by many people who wanted to test its acceleration, or were just insensitive to the proper way to break in a new engine. For similar reasons, I would avoid a car that has sat on the lot for a long time.

    I hope this helps!!!
    Joel

Answers

  • zaken1 10/13/08 12:27 am PST

    If the battery were fully charged every two weeks (because the current draw of the computer will drain the battery in less than a month) there would be no damage done to the battery. However, in the real world, dealers seldom charge batteries as often as they should. As a result, if you buy a car that has sat on the lot for a long time, the battery will probably be compromised, and will not last long after you get it. I would demand that a new battery be installed, before I would buy such a car.

    Lifter noise is not nice to hear; it suggests that oil has drained down from critical parts. In a new engine which has not yet been broken in; this can result in more damage than it does in a fully broken in engine. Excessive camshaft wear is one of the likely consequences.

    Because the first hundred miles are the most critical, in determining the engine's ultimate level of performance, I would never buy a car that has been used as a demonstrator; and was driven by many people who wanted to test its acceleration, or were just insensitive to the proper way to break in a new engine. For similar reasons, I would avoid a car that has sat on the lot for a long time.

    I hope this helps!!!
    Joel

  • tony78 10/13/08 12:41 am PST

    Unless the car was a mid season delivery,,such as a 2008 1/2 model,,there is a good possibility that the car has been sitting on the dealers lot for 12 months,,,as we are in the 10th month of the year now.

    Generally the dealership should start and move each vehicle at least once a month.

    The jeep stalled because the car was probally still cold and the batteries charge was still low.

    About the only time most new cars get driven is when they are coming off the assembly line onto waiting delivery vehicles and then coming off delivery vehicles to thier place at the new car dealership.

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Top Engine No start Experts View More

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1. zaken1 4420
2. MrShift@Edmunds 3345
3. karjunkie 2985
4. docj 830
5. tony78 755
6. 0patience 570
7. Stever@Edmunds 460
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