Edmunds Answers

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  • avatar zaken1 11/11/08 2:57 am PST

    Did you check to make sure all the wire terminals are actually snapped on to the metal posts in the coil and distributor cap; rather than just sitting against the posts, underneath their boots? Similarly, the metal terminals could have slid back inside the plug connectors; instead of snapping on to the plugs.
     
    But as far as what I would do if the last grounds don't stop the arcing; I would then run a compression test on all the cylinders. If they all aren't more than about 140psi, then you have a mechanical problem. If the compression is very low, one of the most likely causes would be a timing chain that has jumped one or more teeth, so the cam is now out of time.
     
    I'd also like to see what a timing light shows. Do the ignition timing marks line up at the factory specs, at idle? And does the timing advance at least 20 degrees from where it is at idle, when you bring the engine speed up to about 3,000 rpm? If the timing does not advance when you speed up the engine; then the ignition module is probably defective. And if the ignition timing is way off at idle, the timing chain may have jumped.
     
    The black smoke and terrible mileage come from a very rich fuel mixture. But I can't tell whether that is a separate problem; or whether it is a side effect of whatever is wrong with the ignition; and that's why I don't want to do anything about the richness until you come up with the information I asked for above.

Answers

  • zaken1 11/11/08 2:57 am PST

    Did you check to make sure all the wire terminals are actually snapped on to the metal posts in the coil and distributor cap; rather than just sitting against the posts, underneath their boots? Similarly, the metal terminals could have slid back inside the plug connectors; instead of snapping on to the plugs.
     
    But as far as what I would do if the last grounds don't stop the arcing; I would then run a compression test on all the cylinders. If they all aren't more than about 140psi, then you have a mechanical problem. If the compression is very low, one of the most likely causes would be a timing chain that has jumped one or more teeth, so the cam is now out of time.
     
    I'd also like to see what a timing light shows. Do the ignition timing marks line up at the factory specs, at idle? And does the timing advance at least 20 degrees from where it is at idle, when you bring the engine speed up to about 3,000 rpm? If the timing does not advance when you speed up the engine; then the ignition module is probably defective. And if the ignition timing is way off at idle, the timing chain may have jumped.
     
    The black smoke and terrible mileage come from a very rich fuel mixture. But I can't tell whether that is a separate problem; or whether it is a side effect of whatever is wrong with the ignition; and that's why I don't want to do anything about the richness until you come up with the information I asked for above.

  • iinvno1 11/13/08 10:42 am PST

    J I can't find the timming marks that you were asking for only thing I can find is ^ well it looks like that little mark mounted on the block and also a slot on the dampner. I did notice when replacing the dist that I could only seat it two ways the correct way and 180 off. It has a slot that matches to a stud on the block so there is no adjustment. It is equipped with edi. I don't know how much this matters but that is what I have found so far I con't get a tester untill friday. By the way I am getting the leak from the ignition through my stereo sys I can hear every hit from the coil. I would guess that is a short??? Getting throughly frustrated. Well I hope this one gets to you I have been trying since tues.

  • zaken1 11/14/08 2:01 am PST

    It looks like the comment Steve left on one of your other posts was correct; You have posted questions in several different locations. The links I received took me to what appeared to be an old post that I had already answered. But it might be that I didn't scroll down far enough to find the latest addition. Anyway, this problem can be cleared up if you post all future replies by clocking the button at the bottom of this one particular thread. Don't post any questions about this discussion anywhere else. And I will then know where to look.

    The little mark and notch you mentioned are probably the factory timing marks. Just chalk up the notch so it can be easily seen under the timing light. If the notch is not visible when you run the engine, it is probably hidden under the water pump pulley when you look for it with the light. In that case, try making more chalk marks a few inches clockwise from the notch on the pulley. You'll eventually get a mark you can see. Once you see a mark while the engine is idling; try speeding the engine up, and see if the mark moves. The mark should move 3 or 4 inches to the left on the pulley by the time the engine speed has increased to about 3,000 rpm. If it does, then the elecronic advance circuit is working properly. But if it does not move; then there is a problem in the electronic advance circuit. In that case, you'll probably have to replace the module (even though the module tested good for generating sparks). 

    If the mark moves like I described, then I believe the problem is that when you installed the distributor in the block; you meshed the drive gear one tooth off from where it should have been. It is possible to install the distributor with the gear in several different positions. (The oil pump drive can be moved to match any position of the distributor shaft.) Here's the way to check for a mis-meshed drive gear: Turn the engine until the factory timing marks line up. Be careful to get them within one inch of being exactly lined up. Remove the distributor cap, and see where the tip of the rotor is pointing. It should either point to the terminal which goes to the plug wire for #1 cylinder, or to the terminal that is 180 degrees opposite the #1 wire. If it points to any other terminal, or points between two terminals; then it is out of phase. If you have a distributor with horizontal terminals, you'll have to be very careful to turn the cap over so that you can look into the inside, and see which terminal inside the cap leads to which plug wire. You may need to make a mark on the distributor body to make it easier to see where the terminal is when the cap is installed.

    DO NOT TURN THE ENGINE DURING THIS PROCEDURE. If the rotor does not point exactly to either the #1 wire, or the wire 180 degrees from it; then make a careful note of where the rotor now points (maybe by scribing a mark on the distributor). You will now have to pull the distributor out far enough to allow the shaft to turn. The goal is to mesh the shaft so that the rotor tip will point directly to whichever of the two cap terminals is now closer to it; either the terminal for the #1 wire, or for the wire 180 degrees from #1. Bear in mind that the shaft will turn clockwise as you insert it into mesh with the gear in the engine. It may take several tries before you get the shaft lined up with the correct terminal, after it is fully inserted. After you get the shaft lined up; tighten the distributor bolt, and reinstall the cap and wires. Then try to start the engine. If it is lined up properly, the engine should run well.

    Let me know how this works out.
    Joel






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