Edmunds Answers

Voted Best Answer

  • avatar MrShift@Edmunds 01/24/11 2:50 pm PST

    Well it really doesn't even pay for you to waste your time figuring this out (it's a negligible amount anyway for 3,000 miles, maybe $50--$100) because the dealer isn't budging.


    To negotiate, you need to offer the price you are willing to pay and if they say NO, then walk away. You cannot negotiate if you can't walk. You must be able to simply walk away from the table. If they are serious about negotiating, they will definitely call you back.

    Charging more for a CPO car is totally acceptable, as it costs the dealer to prepare a car for this factory-supported program. This assumes, of course, that this is a genuine HONDA-certified car and not Marty the Used Car Man's "certified" program.

    You can appraise this car using Edmunds TRUE MARKET VALUE

    Be sure to put in miles, color, equipment and your own zip code.

Answers

  • MrShift@Edmunds 01/24/11 2:50 pm PST

    Well it really doesn't even pay for you to waste your time figuring this out (it's a negligible amount anyway for 3,000 miles, maybe $50--$100) because the dealer isn't budging.


    To negotiate, you need to offer the price you are willing to pay and if they say NO, then walk away. You cannot negotiate if you can't walk. You must be able to simply walk away from the table. If they are serious about negotiating, they will definitely call you back.

    Charging more for a CPO car is totally acceptable, as it costs the dealer to prepare a car for this factory-supported program. This assumes, of course, that this is a genuine HONDA-certified car and not Marty the Used Car Man's "certified" program.

    You can appraise this car using Edmunds TRUE MARKET VALUE

    Be sure to put in miles, color, equipment and your own zip code.

  • Stever@Edmunds 01/24/11 2:51 pm PST

    Edmunds' True Cost to Own tool will tell you yearly depreciation, based on driving 15,000 miles a year.

    Sounds like the dealer is the one playing games though, with adding on the CPO price. You may want to double-check and see if that's the official Honda CPO program or just the dealer's own version.

    Might be easier just to figure out TMV and offer a bit less than that, as an "out the door" price (with your taxes and registration fee).



  • greyhoundlover 01/24/11 7:30 pm PST

    Thank you for your responses. What you both are saying makes sense. For me, I guess it's less about the money than it is about the attitude of my dealer. They advertise that the car is certified and advertise a price. I saw the car's price listed on a different website for $300 less and then they try to get me to pay $800 for the certification. So the way I see it, they are trying to get me to pay $1,100 more than the asking price.


    Also, I would understand their policy, "The price is the price" if the miles were the miles. But that price was when the car had 3,000 less miles. Regardless, the car is a good deal. Otherwise, I would have already walked away. I got the dealer to agree that I should not have to pay for the Honda certification since it does not say that anywhere in their advertising. Now, I want them to drop the price of the car $600 for the miles, plus the $300 difference in price between the 2 websites, so $900 total. I think this is reasonable.

    This is my first time buying a used car. I have leased my previous 3 cars, but I have never had an experience where I felt the car dealer was unwilling to work with me on the price. Like I said, it's not so much about the money. I just am not even sure I want to give this dealer my business after all this. What is your opinion?

  • Stever@Edmunds 01/24/11 11:23 pm PST

    Well, if you go ahead and buy the Pilot, you're just rewarding the dealer's behavior. I'm not the one who needs and wants a new car though. :-)



    The situation you describe sounds like bait and switch. I'd let the local consumer protection agency or attorney general's office know what's going on.

  • MrShift@Edmunds 01/25/11 3:14 am PST

    yes Steve is right....the price for the CPO should be reflected in the asking price, not added on later.


    However, I still think the 3,000 miles is a negligible factor in the negotiation and you shouldn't let that get in your way.

  • isellhondas 01/25/11 1:46 pm PST

    This is very simple.

    Make an offer that you feel comfortable with and if they say no, just walk away.

    Those miles aren't going to affect the value much at all.

  • scanman1 01/25/11 2:21 pm PST

    Go to the greyhound race put that 300 dollars on your favorite dog win pay what they want, you gottcha carproblem solved lol, like greyhounds too

ADVERTISEMENT

Top Car Buying Experts View More

Rank Leader Points
1. Stever@Edmunds 10905
2. MrShift@Edmunds 7040
3. morin2 5555
4. karjunkie 4135
5. texases 3690
6. knowledgepower 3550
7. zaken1 2225
ADVERTISEMENT