Edmunds Answers

Voted Best Answer

  • avatar MrShift@Edmunds 09/14/09 12:13 pm PST

    Not an easy task. There's really no established method for doing this, so that's why you can't find one.

    Some ideas:

    1. Unless you know someone in law enforcement, DMV is probably not going to release any information on the identity of the current owner (even if they keep records on cars that old, which they may no longer carry in their computer). You'd have to have at least the old license # or VIN for DMV to do anything for you. In some states, the license plates stay with the car, in others, no.

    2.If you have the VIN #, CARFAX might show you where the car is currently registered but again, not the owner's name or address.

    3. Place an ad and description in your local craigslist. Who knows?

    However, unless the car was collectible in some way, chances are, statistically speaking I mean, that after 13 years it's been junked.

    If it was "collectible" (as much as any 96 car is collectible that is), say a Corvette or Impala SS, you might advertise in Hemmings Motor News and see what turns up. Again, VIN # would be most useful.





Answers

  • MrShift@Edmunds 09/14/09 12:13 pm PST

    Not an easy task. There's really no established method for doing this, so that's why you can't find one.

    Some ideas:

    1. Unless you know someone in law enforcement, DMV is probably not going to release any information on the identity of the current owner (even if they keep records on cars that old, which they may no longer carry in their computer). You'd have to have at least the old license # or VIN for DMV to do anything for you. In some states, the license plates stay with the car, in others, no.

    2.If you have the VIN #, CARFAX might show you where the car is currently registered but again, not the owner's name or address.

    3. Place an ad and description in your local craigslist. Who knows?

    However, unless the car was collectible in some way, chances are, statistically speaking I mean, that after 13 years it's been junked.

    If it was "collectible" (as much as any 96 car is collectible that is), say a Corvette or Impala SS, you might advertise in Hemmings Motor News and see what turns up. Again, VIN # would be most useful.





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