Edmunds Answers

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  • avatar kiawah 01/04/08 5:02 pm PST

    If the vibration is most noticeable around 50-60 mph, then it is usually a tire out of balance, as previously suggested. If it vibrates all the time, I'd suspect bent wheel or bad tire.

    You don't say how old the tires are and how much tread left. One of the ways that tires get out of balance however, is that the alignment is off and the tires tread gets worn away in abnormal fashion. So although the balancing the tire might fix the immediate problem, if your alignment is off the problem will come back again.

    Many alignment shops will check your alignment for you, and only charge you if it actually needs alignment, so you may want to check around in your area of the country to see if that is their local practice. You need to evaluate how much tread life you have left on those tires, to help you determine your course of action. May not make sense to balance a set of tires that are almost gone, if you only do local low speed driving. Save the alignment and balance until you get a new set of tires. If the tires have a lot of tread life left, get them rebalanced and check the alignment.

Answers

  • msadventure 01/04/08 3:02 pm PST

    It might be. The way I check for alignment issues with my Honda del Sol is to set the steering wheel straight as I'm driving and then let go. If the car stays straight, I think my alignment is okay; if it veers to the left or right. I go have it checked out. Ultimately, I don't know of any reliable way to check it yourself but maybe someone else does. My advice would be to head over to your trusty mechanic and have them take a look. Good luck!

  • MrShift@Edmunds 01/04/08 4:18 pm PST

    Possibly, possibly, but I'd be more inclined to suspect a wheel balance issue or an irregular tire.

  • kiawah 01/04/08 5:02 pm PST

    If the vibration is most noticeable around 50-60 mph, then it is usually a tire out of balance, as previously suggested. If it vibrates all the time, I'd suspect bent wheel or bad tire.

    You don't say how old the tires are and how much tread left. One of the ways that tires get out of balance however, is that the alignment is off and the tires tread gets worn away in abnormal fashion. So although the balancing the tire might fix the immediate problem, if your alignment is off the problem will come back again.

    Many alignment shops will check your alignment for you, and only charge you if it actually needs alignment, so you may want to check around in your area of the country to see if that is their local practice. You need to evaluate how much tread life you have left on those tires, to help you determine your course of action. May not make sense to balance a set of tires that are almost gone, if you only do local low speed driving. Save the alignment and balance until you get a new set of tires. If the tires have a lot of tread life left, get them rebalanced and check the alignment.

  • bandit10 05/02/08 9:05 pm PST

    I would have my wheels balanced. Typically a shimmy at the steering wheel is usually the front tires, and when you feel a shimmy under your seat it's a rear wheel out of balance. If you can drive in a straight line and let go of the wheel and she continues straight, your alignment should be okay. It it pulls left or right with hands off the wheel then alignment is in order. Good Luck. Bandit.

  • mommsews 10/14/12 4:26 am PST

    Could be tie rod, cradle bushing or stablizer bars. I replaced bushing had l alot less vibration.Then had tie rod done. Minimal vibration still, due to tire wear and need for allignment.Looking for tires now.

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