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  • zaken1 06/18/10 1:39 pm PST

    Hi John,

    Thanks for anticipating the information I'd need to respond to your question. I now know that you replaced the distributor cap; but the short statement in your list of 6 sounds like you may have replaced the whole distributor, not just the cap. I'd appreciate full details on that.

    Although you say that the car does not have a spark, I need to know precisely what you did to check for spark. Unfortunately, people who write in often use the phrase "no spark" to mean many different things; some of which have little connection to whether there physically is an ignition spark.

    The reason I asked whether the rotor turns when the starter is cranked was to eliminate the possibility of a broken timing belt. But timing belts can also jump out of mesh from looseness; which would throw the synchronization of the camshaft and distributor off and prevent the motor from running, even though the belt had not broken. So I'd like you to do a test to determine the relationship between the crankshaft and distributor positions.

    Locate the ignition timing notch or line which is located on the crankshaft pulley. If necessary, mark it with chalk to make it easily visible. Then find the degree scale or pointer on the timing belt cover next to the pulley; which is used to indicate the crankshaft position during timing measurement. If the timing mark on the pulley is far from the scale or pointer, turn the crankshaft by using the starter to move it closer to the scale or pointer. Then use a wrench on the crankshaft, or push the vehicle in second or third gear (if it has a manual transmission) until the timing marks line up at between 5 and 10 degrees BTDC. Once the timing marks are lined up; remove the distributor cap, and look at the rotor to see where the rotor tip points. It should point either to the position of the cap terminal (when the cap is in place) for the # 1 cylinder plug wire; or to the cap terminal for # 4 cylinder plug wire. It should point directly at that terminal; not half way to some other terminal, or anywhere else. If the rotor position is not where it should be; the timing belt has gone out of synch, and will have to be replaced.

    Please post the results of this test, along with just what you did to check for spark; by clicking the "answer this question" button below the last response to this thread. Thank you for your cooperation.

  • jml1800 06/20/10 10:12 am PST

    thank you for your repsonse

    Yes I did change the entire cap rotor and distrubator with a used distrubator but i bought a new distrubator cap. The method of checking the spark was i pulled the spark plug wire and put a tester inside and someone cranked the car the light did not come on from the tester. I also did pull the cap and the rotor was turning. Any help is greatlly appreciated

    -John

  • zaken1 06/20/10 10:26 am PST

    Hi John,
    I'd like you to do a test to determine the relationship between the crankshaft and distributor positions.

    Locate the ignition timing notch or line which is located on the crankshaft pulley. If necessary, mark it with chalk to make it easily visible. Then find the degree scale or pointer on the timing belt cover next to the pulley; which is used to indicate the crankshaft position during timing measurement. If the timing mark on the pulley is far from the scale or pointer, turn the crankshaft by using the starter to move it closer to the scale or pointer. Then use a wrench on the crankshaft, or push the vehicle in second or third gear (if it has a manual transmission) until the timing marks line up at between 5 and 10 degrees BTDC. Once the timing marks are lined up; remove the distributor cap, and look at the rotor to see where the rotor tip points. It should point either to the position of the cap terminal (when the cap is in place) for the # 1 cylinder plug wire; or to the cap terminal for # 4 cylinder plug wire. It should point directly at that terminal; not half way to some other terminal, or anywhere else. If the rotor position is not where it should be; the timing belt has gone out of synch, and will have to be replaced.

    Please post what you find from this test. Thanks.

  • zeruspocus 09/01/13 7:33 am PST

    Hello! fisrt sorry for my english. I have a Toyota Corolla 1994 in very good condition with 50000miles. The car was working perfectly until i disconect two distributor wire and a friend of my was trying to start the car 2 or 3 times without the distributor cables, because was disconected. when i notice that i put the two wires in the same right place (im pretty shure of this), but the car wont start and ckranck perfectly. The yellow CHECK light is ON when i turn on the key. It seems like dont get power to distributor because i dont see the spark if i pull the wire to test. Can be the computer or something like that?
    Any idea?

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