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  • avatar aznraptor 01/10/08 3:14 am PST

    It really depends on how many miles you've had on those tires already. It's quite important to make sure the tires on each axle are equal. It would be nice for all four to wear evenly, but front and back difference doesn't matter too much. If you've driven on the tires for quite a while now, you'll probably want to change the flat and the tire on the other side, but the other two should be okay, especially since most AWD cars act the same as FWD almost all the time.

Answers

  • Stever@Edmunds 01/06/08 3:53 pm PST

    AWD cars need to have tires that closely match - in other words, you don't want big variations in the tire diameter since that can cause problems with the differentials or viscous couplings in an AWD car.

    Check with your Buick dealer or review your owner's manual - you may be able to just buy one tire or put two new tires on the same axle. Or you may be able to buy one tire and have it "shaved" to match your other three. Different manufacturers have different recommendations for what you can do.

    Source: http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiretech/
    t...

  • MrShift@Edmunds 01/06/08 5:31 pm PST

    I don't think so. The two tires on the same axle should vary by no more than 3% difference in circumference, so you may need to buy two tires. Differences between front and back should not matter.

    So if your current tire (the one on the same axle that isn't flat) doesn't have a lot of miles on it, you might get away with just one tire, if you can match the size and tread type. It would be great if you could buy the exact same tire, brand, tread, etc.

  • aznraptor 01/10/08 3:14 am PST

    It really depends on how many miles you've had on those tires already. It's quite important to make sure the tires on each axle are equal. It would be nice for all four to wear evenly, but front and back difference doesn't matter too much. If you've driven on the tires for quite a while now, you'll probably want to change the flat and the tire on the other side, but the other two should be okay, especially since most AWD cars act the same as FWD almost all the time.

  • rickmn 04/07/08 3:32 pm PST

    Sorry to disagree with the others, but difference in tire circumference in an AWD vehicle MATTER A GREAT DEAL. Differences in rotation rate between front and rear wheels all end up in the AWD unit. The unit allows for some slippage/difference, but if it's constant, you can burn up the unit. Best bet is to measure tread depth or tire circumference on the other tires and buy a new one. Then take it to a tire place that "trues" ("shaves") tires so it matches the circumference.

    Source: 

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