Edmunds Answers

Voted Best Answer

  • avatar Stever@Edmunds 04/23/09 3:00 pm PST

    Small claims sounds like a good idea. Hopefully the other driver got a ticket for leaving the scene and something for failure to yield, and hopefully you can get copies of that stuff to give to the court. I didn't realize that you knew the owner from your initial post.

    And I'd still report the other insurance company to the state for failing to negotiate your claim in good faith (or whatever buzzword the investigator you call recommends that you put in your complaint).

    Anyway, Kelley says the curb weight for a '94 Econoline E250 cargo van is 5067 pounds. Ladder racks would add some more weight plus the van's GVWR is 7200 pounds. The racks indicate that the guy probably was hauling parts and tools. Heavy stuff, in other words. I think a small claims judge would be as influenced about the owner's occupation and what is typically carried in a work van than the raw numbers.

    I'm assuming it is the Econoline van style since it has ladder racks and not one of the little box trucks stuck on a similar platform. Wikipedia's E-Series page may help you narrow down the style of the van/truck that hit you.

    But like Tony says, there's more than just vehicle weight involved here.

Answers

  • tony78 04/22/09 10:01 pm PST

    There are too many variables here to provide a conclusive answer based on the information that you provided.

    A. At exactly what speed was the van traveling / sliding when it hit your vehicle ( these would be calculations of mass and inertia among other things ).

    B. which part of the van impacted your car.

    C. What were the atmospheric conditions at the time of the collision.

    D. What was the combined weight of the vans operator, passenger ( if any ) accessories and cargo.

    E. What was the vans weight distribution ( front to back ).

    These are just a few of the variables required to complete the comparison that you have requested.

  • tony78 04/22/09 10:05 pm PST

    Umm, you did have insurance, yes,,on yourself and your vehicle ?

    So why isin't your insurance agent figuring all of this stuff out ?


  • Stever@Edmunds 04/22/09 10:08 pm PST

    Unless there's more to the story, either you were insured or not. Either the Volvo was totaled or it wasn't. I don't understand why the insurance company is asking you to come up with estimated weights of the hit and run driver. Have they denied your claim or accused you of fraud?

    You may want to contact your state's division of insurance and ask them to get involved. Insurance is heavily regulated and the state should have their own investigators who could look into the situation.

  • rapotap 04/23/09 2:23 pm PST

    OK - no the Volvo was not insured for "collision" so it is the insur co of the Ford van's owner who will not believe this accident could have happened. The Ford van was in a skid on an icy snowy road, out of control, and slid into the Volvo, impacting it at the driver's, and rear driver's side passenger door.



    The Volvo doors were smashed in - it is a 98 Volvo xc70. they are worth between 4800-5600 approx., so a $5000 repair bill is considered a total. The van's front bumper hit the Volvo, pretty square on. There was next to no damage done to the ford van's bumper - yet the damage to the Volvo is considerable!!!


    I am taking the guy to small claims court. I am trying to determine the weight of the van in comparison to the Volvo - just to back up my claim. The insurance company seems to think this accident could not have happened.

    Source: 

  • Stever@Edmunds 04/23/09 3:00 pm PST

    Small claims sounds like a good idea. Hopefully the other driver got a ticket for leaving the scene and something for failure to yield, and hopefully you can get copies of that stuff to give to the court. I didn't realize that you knew the owner from your initial post.

    And I'd still report the other insurance company to the state for failing to negotiate your claim in good faith (or whatever buzzword the investigator you call recommends that you put in your complaint).

    Anyway, Kelley says the curb weight for a '94 Econoline E250 cargo van is 5067 pounds. Ladder racks would add some more weight plus the van's GVWR is 7200 pounds. The racks indicate that the guy probably was hauling parts and tools. Heavy stuff, in other words. I think a small claims judge would be as influenced about the owner's occupation and what is typically carried in a work van than the raw numbers.

    I'm assuming it is the Econoline van style since it has ladder racks and not one of the little box trucks stuck on a similar platform. Wikipedia's E-Series page may help you narrow down the style of the van/truck that hit you.

    But like Tony says, there's more than just vehicle weight involved here.

  • rapotap 04/23/09 3:24 pm PST

    THANK YOU! I'll proceed to the state insurance commission with a complaint as well. No, the driver hit and DROVE off - but we chased him & got the plate #. He can't be prosecuted criminally (cited, nothin') if we did not see his FACE and could not identify him. So it is all up to me to present what I've got to a judge. Now - How much does my volvo xc70 weigh? I just don't know where to find this info!! but thank you a lot.

  • subearu 04/24/09 7:05 am PST

    The curb weight of the '98 XC70 according to KBB (click here) is 3,728 lbs.

    -Brian

  • rayfinseats 07/17/10 12:42 am PST

    E=MC squared or force = mass times acceleration. How fast was it going???

ADVERTISEMENT

Top Ford Econoline Experts View More

Rank Leader Points
1. Stever@Edmunds 70
2. knowledgepower 35
3. MrShift@Edmunds 25
4. tony78 20
ADVERTISEMENT