Edmunds Answers

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  • avatar MrShift@Edmunds 09/10/10 7:03 pm PST

    Well, given that the OEM rims bent----do you recall the incident? If they got bent and you don't even recall why, that rather speaks to the strength of the OEM rims, doesn't it?

    Yes you can true up bent rims if they aren't too bad, but you should price out both OEMs new, as well as aftermarket rims (set of 4) from someplace like TIRERACK. Then you can decide how the various costs match up.

    If you DO recall the incident and it was a severe pothole, etc., maybe the OEM rims can be absolved of being too cheesy.

    HERE IS A PRICE LIST (for wheel repair) -- I don't know these people and I'm not recommending them per se. They might be great, I don't know.

Answers

  • morin2 09/10/10 7:01 pm PST

    You should compare the cost of repairing the bent wheels to replacing them. I have always bought wheels on ebay and found that to be a good source of pricing information.

    There is the bigger issue of why the wheels became damaged. Do you have low profile tires on relatively large diameter wheels? If so, potholes can pinch the tire enough to dent the wheel. Low profile tires require frequent air pressure checks - like every weekend. Many municipalities have cut back on road maintenence due to budget cuts, so potholes are worse than ever.

    Steel wheels are less susceptible to this kind of damage, so if you have lots of potholes, this could be an alternative for you. But they rust and don't look as nice as alloys. I have, however, sandblasted them and then painted them with chrome paint and they looked pretty decent.


  • MrShift@Edmunds 09/10/10 7:03 pm PST

    Well, given that the OEM rims bent----do you recall the incident? If they got bent and you don't even recall why, that rather speaks to the strength of the OEM rims, doesn't it?

    Yes you can true up bent rims if they aren't too bad, but you should price out both OEMs new, as well as aftermarket rims (set of 4) from someplace like TIRERACK. Then you can decide how the various costs match up.

    If you DO recall the incident and it was a severe pothole, etc., maybe the OEM rims can be absolved of being too cheesy.

    HERE IS A PRICE LIST (for wheel repair) -- I don't know these people and I'm not recommending them per se. They might be great, I don't know.

  • isellhondas 09/10/10 9:01 pm PST

    Wow...75.00 - 180.00 to straighten an alloy wheel?

    Add the shipping to that! Nuts!

  • blackadder5639 09/10/10 9:26 pm PST

    This is not an answer (I asked the question, LOL) but follow-ups to the questions asked by the people who have kindly answered my question:

    1. I do have low-profile tires. I think the profile ratio is 50%, and the wheel diameter is 16 inches. The car originally came with these low-profile tires, and I have been using the same size of tires ever since I bought the car.

    2. I do not remember the exact event, although I suspect that my skidding off a slippery, icy road late last year might be the culprit.
    The roads I have used in the past 2 years have hardly had potholes, so I don't think potholes are the culprit.

    3. According to the link kindly provided by Mr. Shiftright, the cost of repairing a bent wheel ($75) is not much less than the price of a new aftermarket wheel (from $83 to about $110 at Discount Tire). New OEM wheels cost a ridiculous $500 a piece, so replacement with new OEM wheels is not an option. It might be a good idea to just replace my OEM wheels with aftermarket ones, assuming that the aftermarket wheels are at least of the same quality as the OEM ones.

  • MrShift@Edmunds 09/11/10 11:41 am PST

    I think that before you buy any aftermarket wheels, you look up reviews for that wheel on the Internet, to make sure they are of decent quality. Tire Rack has reviews and I'm sure other sites do as well.

    Low profile tires + a bit of bad luck on the road can often lead to disaster. 16" are generally okay, 17" can be marginal and 18" is just asking for trouble IMO. Maybe 18" or 19" on a Ferrari is okay because those wheels cost a bundle, but on a compact car, I don't think the factory provides the very best quality here.

    People want the sexy low profile look and they want the excellent handling you can get from these, but there's a trade-off.


  • blackadder5639 09/17/10 1:52 am PST



    Thanks, guys, for the very helpful answers. I replaced my wheels with an aftermarket model from Discount Tire. Their technicians were very helpful and got me wheels that are close in characteristics to the OEM wheel. All for a reasonable price: less than $500, including installation and taxes. I did not have to buy new tires.

    The ride quality of my car is now much better!

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