Edmunds Answers

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  • avatar gearhead1977 01/27/09 9:22 pm PST

    The bearing could have been faulty at assembly and took until now to show the defect. Any really hard hit or side load (bouncing off of a curb) could do it. You don't say how much mileage you have on the vehicle, these parts don't last indefinitely. Pretty darn close, but not indefinitely. When you have the part replaced, ask the mechanic if they can figure out why it happened. Oh yeah, you have to fix it. Eventually, the bearing will fail, causing the wheel to seize and lock-up, possibly at a very bad time (like on the highway)

Answers

  • gearhead1977 01/27/09 9:22 pm PST

    The bearing could have been faulty at assembly and took until now to show the defect. Any really hard hit or side load (bouncing off of a curb) could do it. You don't say how much mileage you have on the vehicle, these parts don't last indefinitely. Pretty darn close, but not indefinitely. When you have the part replaced, ask the mechanic if they can figure out why it happened. Oh yeah, you have to fix it. Eventually, the bearing will fail, causing the wheel to seize and lock-up, possibly at a very bad time (like on the highway)

  • K4RZW 01/28/09 7:17 pm PST

    Thanks for the reply.  As a follow-up, the hub assembly was replaced today.  The mechanic could find no obvious damage; however, it was clear from listening to the assembly that the bearings were rubbing.  He suspected that it was either not build correctly or that the seal had developed a leak and water had gotten into the bearing and it had started to rust.  It sounded like it contained grit.  The bearing had almost 64,000 miles.

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