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  • knowledgepower 02/12/12 6:39 am PST

    The lack of a front seat console doesn't mean more leg room, you can research any vehicle and check it's specs on this website and choose the comparison option. Most coupes have the most leg room because they have more front to back movement in the seat but still compare.

  • Stever@Edmunds 02/12/12 9:02 am PST

    It can mean more knee room, especially if you like a more upright seating position.

    I'm not a big guy but it bothers me when I drive a car (or ride shotgun) and my knees wind up hitting the door or console.

    Unfortunately I don't know any sites that measure that sort of thing.

    That's one reason I'm still driving my older minivan. The dash isn't intrusive and I can stretch in lots of different ways on my road trips, especially when I'm running with the cruise control. Very comfortable ride, especially compared to my older Outback that has a full blown console (thanks to the AWD transmission hump) plus a dumb power window switch that protrudes from the door.

    You may want to check out vans and pickups.

    Source: 

  • morin2 02/12/12 10:11 am PST

    Rather than the presence-absence of a console, its location may be important - especially, as Steve indicates, for knee room. Some newer consoles are located so far back that you really have to twist & reach backwards to use them - they are more in line with the hips than anything else.

    My 2011 Suzuki sx-4 AWD crossover has no console - but I don't think its a vehicle known for lots of leg (or knee) room.

  • lnstrinc 02/13/12 10:53 pm PST

    Thanks for the ideas and answers. I ended up buying a 2010 Odyssey. Of all the vehichles I've seen, it had more horizontal leg room with nothing to intefere with sliding the right leg outward, toward center. The Toyota Sienna was pretty good, but it had some sort of floor tray with a lip which prevented quick, easy sliding of the leg back and forth. For long road trips, using cruise control, it's nice to have this capability, especially if your prone to leg and hip discomfort.
    BUT, the Odyssey is a gas hound in town, so I was looking around.
    Interesting that most all cars nowdays have this cockpit-type driver's compartment which is created by the console on the right side.

  • Stever@Edmunds 02/13/12 10:55 pm PST

    We came close to buying one in '99 when the sliding door generation came out but the passenger side felt cramped. Not enough room between the seat and the dash. Wasn't the reason we didn't buy it but we noticed that. The newer Odysseys are better.

    Nice rigs - my brother has one ('05 iirc) and they really like it.

    No minivan, not even the Mazda5, gets "great" city mpg. They sure are versatile rigs though. Congrats!

    Source: 

  • standingo 06/13/13 3:32 am PST

    I'm sure that you intended to include "knee room" when you wrote "leg room"--so those answers saying the "cockpit" design doesn't cramp leg room are bogus answers.

    I have been looking all up and down the range of available vehicles for something that doesn't cause bone bruises on the outer sides of both my knees. No luck yet. I assume that this "cockpit" design is being dictated by the insurance underwriters and their "crashworthiness" testing. Otherwise, why would ALL the manufacturers put out products that punish a grown man's knees? And they don't even make any of the obviously simple adjustments that might make the situation more "knee friendly". They could scoop out an area on both sides (door panel and console) where your knees want to go--without compromising anything about the underlying structure. But no, they just produce ads pretending that 7-foot+ basketball players can actually fit into those cars. I did sit in a Buick Enclave in which there was no diagonal door handle on the driver's side (there was one on the passenger side). Maybe that was a token gesture toward knee-friendliness, but not enough. But at least that gesture obliterates the idea that the console and door panels have to be symmetrical and/or identical on both sides. There needs to be more done about this. The 2014 Chevy Impala was high on my list until I sat in one. No chance--but it would be so very easy for them to make more room for drivers' knees in that design.

    I am six-foot, one-inch, and proudly own a low-mileage 1998 Bonneville with bucket-on-bench seats and NO knee-knocker features. It would be an excellent "go-by" for the car/suv designers to check out. Funny, isn't it, how the "crashworthiness" concerns dictate a design that causes persistent pain and suffering, even without a crash?

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